educational television

Last night we watched the last 20 minutes or so of The Story Of The Weeping Camel.
We were just in time to see the camel weep and missed the 40 minutes of back story but it was just enough time for me to consider moving to the Gobi desert.

I would recommend watching the entire program as the ending was somewhat mesmerizing. I'll try to catch it when it's on again.

Life in the desert does seem harsh. I read on the website about the trials of living a nomadic life and it sounds like the winters can be cruel.
But the idea of life in a Ger sounds so simple that right now it holds great appeal.

not yurts

Silly us! We thought they lived in yurts! Anyway - aside from the fact that they are basically tents, they are quite large and they have ornate doors which must face south. I'm all about that kind of decor. Inside, the floor is lined with carpets and everything is very cozy.
I suppose I'd have to get used to the nomadic lifestyle. I've often said that I'm not good with change, but one must go where the animals can eat, so I guess I'd adjust to my lifestyle being ABOUT change.
One member of the family, in the show, had a motorcycle, to take to town, so that would be good if I needed to get out of the desert for an afternoon.

The entire extended family live together in the Ger(s). I'm not sure if that would go well for me - maybe just the five people who live in my house could live in my tent.

grandma

Or maybe K and I could go alone and adopt a family to live with. The people seemed so happy - content, actually. There was a wonderful scene with two small children playing store in the sand - the girl was the shop keeper and the boy was a customer. He had little slips of paper that he used as play-money and bought some toy cars and an alarm clock. It pleased me to see that children play the same way all over the world.

Of course you know what I liked best about the story - THE WARDROBE. Everyone had terrific hats and coats with very long sleeves. Everyone was bundled up and wrapped tightly in thick wool and silk things.

good hat and coat

People don't worry about cell phone charges and health insurance in the Gobi - then again, people probably perish in the Gobi - BUT LET'S NOT THINK ABOUT THAT.
The family in the show ate well and lived well, and had music...

two strings

and many traditions. Sure, it might be a difficult adjustment for me, but after a few years I'm sure I'd be all nomadish and have the BEST hat.

playing

And my boys would learn to play with tiny rocks and they would help K with the livestock while I made yogurt.

with camels

I'm just not sure about the whole camel thing.

Comments

jenontheedge said…
For me, the deal-breaker would be having to living with extended family. There's just no way.
jenontheedge said…
Uh, that should say "having to live."

It's early and I haven't had any caffeine yet...
I didn't see a place to plug in and recharge the laptop battery. That might be the dealbreaker for me.

And the cute little old man looked really cold.
eurolush said…
Camels are scary, with their enormous, fatty humps. And those huge eyes with their long eyelashes.
Just Plain Jane said…
That film has been on my Netflix queue for quite a while. Maybe now I'll move it closer to the top.
Jennifer said…
Camels freak me out a bit. And I would be afraid of getting spat on all the time.
Dani said…
Between the camel smell, the risk of getting spat at, and the uncertain internet access, I'm guessing you'll be staying in Tuvalu.

You can wear good hats in Tuvalu.
alice c said…
The wardrobe is so you and K could adapt to the new guitar. What worries me is the effect on your skin - did you realise that the woman in the second photo is only 22...
Melissa said…
Camels are pretty decent--gentle animals really. Riding one is kind of relaxing. The wardrobe--yeah, I totally see you digging that. The peace and quiet and simplicity of it all, I get that completely. I'm going to look for this and watch it when it airs again.
jenny said…
There was a Man vs. Wild episode that has me never looking at camels the same way again. Not that I've ever really been a fan...

Love the wardrobe but I'm thinking your boys might not be so thrilled on Christmas morning...

Aw, mom...more rocks???
ssheers said…
I teach Geography, and that's one of the movies I show to every class every semester.

Those are not tiny rocks; they are camel's teeth.

In the beginning of the movie, the only electricty they have is powered by batteries. In the end, they get solar panels so the little boy can watch their new TV. In the sequel, the kids will have ipods hanging from their ears and will be too busy texting on their cell phones to help take care of the camels. I hope I'm kidding.
barbra said…
I agree with you about the children playing!
jordiw said…
Let's see.. on one side we have great, although maybe not greatly CLEAN, clothing, opportunities for creative play for children, comfy seating in the ger. On the other side we have an absence of flush toilets.
I know what side I come down on. I might be considered oddly dressed but I can dress like that where still flush a toilet.
jordiw said…
obviously that should be where "I can" still flush a toilet. I have to remember that preview is there to keep me from getting overly excited about my typing skills. Fingers faster than brain sometimes.
Anonymous said…
I once saw a show on PBS hosted by Cindy Crawford, or someone similarly ridiculously out of place, traveling around the Gobi Desert with a nomadic family. If she could do it, I'm sure you could too.

jbhat
Stowaway said…
I heard camels spit, watch out!

I've read yurts are becoming popular with the younger hip set for camping. There are actual "yurt camp grounds", with deluxe yurts. Say yurt too many times and it sounds funny.

PS. You have the distinction of being the Very First Commenter in my newborn blog, and the Very Second Commenter! That is nice. Thank you.
kmkat said…
The lack of flush toilets -- or even outhouses -- would keep me home. Great movie, though. You and your readers might be interested in the Dulaan Project (http://www.fireprojects.org/dulaan.htm),
which benefits people in Mongolia.
I really am going to have to kill you with a tray aren't I?
Suse said…
I remember going to see that at the cinema. The sight of those two very tiny boys riding off on their camels to go to town (several days journey away) waving goodbye to their parents, nearly did me in.

The bit where the camel weeps was very moving though.
Scot said…
Thanks Alice - totally didn't see that comming! Laughed so hard...coke , literally came out of my nose. Burns like a bitch...but still laughing!
paola said…
NOT for me.
Anonymous said…
do u think you can survive the winter of around minus 40 degrees celius. then I believe u can live in Mongolia